Home > Cycle Training, Norwich Triathlon > Norwich Triathlon Training Ride

Norwich Triathlon Training Ride

Making the most of the good weather, and being back home after a week in sunny Glasgow, I met up with a good friend to ride the Norwich triathlon olympic bike route.

I’ve known Gary for something like 15 years but have not really seen him for some time so it was good to bump into him at the Tri-anglia Waveney 1 traithlon at the beginning of the month. He’s a strong cyclist having done a couple of E’tapes taking in a good few of the most famous mountains France has to offer. As Gary is doing the Olympic tri this year, we thought it would be good to ride the bike route to get a good feel for it.

We joined the route at Saxlingham Nethergate and then proceeded round the course, the first 5 to 10 kilometers were on fairly quiet rides which allowed us to have a good chat. From joining the main road back Woodton into Brooke it was pretty much single file due to the traffic. The road is quite fast although there are a few inclines to consider pacing correctly on race day. Again, the road between Brooke and Poringland was pretty quick and it was nice to turn off toward Arminghall and away from all the cars.

The road to Arminghall is okay but as there are fields either side it could get windy when the road opens up. We then decided to ride to Whitlingham Lane for completeness rather than turn back toward Caister. When we got to the lake we had a quick look at where the ramp comes out of the water and the short run into transition.

The last leg of the course was okay although it takes in Skeet’s Hill, which for us was toward the end of our ride, but on race day will be fairly near the beginning – this is a good little workout for the legs!

Finished off the morning with a nice coffee and chat with Gary and Clare about family, work, cycling and triathlon.

What a great start to the weekend!

As shown in the graphs below, my heart got a good workout. I’m fairly pleased with my cadence and average speed of just under 19 miles an hour (30 km/h) given that I’ve not really cycled further than about 10 miles in one go!

Cadence

Cadence

Elevation

Elevation

Heart Rate

Heart Rate

Timing

Timing

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