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Posts Tagged ‘Garmin Foreunner 310XT’

My Training Levels

March 27, 2012 Leave a comment

Ideally, I would measure my heart rate in swimming, cycling and running – but I haven’t done this yet. Instead, I have calculated my HRmax from the formula 220 – age.

This equates to 220 – 35 (well, I’ll be 35 in May so probably closer to the mark!) which gives me 175 bpm.

Maximal heart rate % of HRmax Actual Figure
T1 65 114
T2 70 123
T3 75 131
T4 80 140
T5 85 149
T6 90 158
T7 95 166
T8 100 175
My heart rate zones as of April 2012
Tempo-level % of HRmax Type Description
T1 65 Very gentle Regeneration and long to very long sessions.
T2 70 Gentle Improves fat metabolism. Training between hard days.
T3 75 Relaxed Base, long sessions. Able to talk easily. Main zone for cardiovascular training.
T4 80 Quick For longer fartlek runs and tempo cycling.
T5 85 Fast Anaerobic threshold zone. Limit loads in first two months of preparation period.
T6 90 Hard Approaching race pace for 70.3 distance. Improving basic speed in training.
T7 95 Very hard Improvement in anaerobic zone, intervals only in short-term. Training for sprint and Olympic distance.
T8 100 Maximal Competition tempo for solo race – 3.1 mile run, 12.4 mile cycle or 550 yard run.
Guide to heart rate zones

I am able to set up training zone alarms on my Garmin Forerunner so that I am alerted each time my heart rate moves into a new zone, I am yet to do this but it will prove a useful tool to concentrate my effort.

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Garmin Forerunner 310XT Product Review

October 28, 2011 2 comments

Link: Garmin Forerunner 310XT from BHIP Ltd.

The 310XT is a great multi-sport device designed for runners, cyclists and swimmers but most importantly, in my opinion, triathletes!

Garmin Forerunner 310XT

Garmin Forerunner 310XT

This is the first Garmin unit which actually feels as comfortable in the water as the user and is water resistant to 50m.

The unit records a whole load of data including pace, speed, distance, elevation, heart rate, cadence and more.

The optional heart rate chest strap, foot pod and bike cadence/speed sensors provide the numbers.

Strictly speaking, the HR chest strap isn’t necessary although I think you’d be missing out on some of the great features available such as heart rate zone training. Also, being able to monitor your HR while training, and indeed, use the HR zones is very helpful to ensure you meet your training objectives.

The GPS function can take care of speed, pace and distance etc if you do not want to shell out for the extra bike and foot sensors.

To record cadence (foot strike) when running you’ll need the foot pod and for cadence on the bike, the bike sensor is required. The bike sensor also provides backup in case satellite connection is lost – not that has ever happened when I’ve been out.

Additionally, the foot pod and bike sensor come in hand if you want to record data from treadmill runs and turbo sessions.

You can set alerts for speed, pace, cadence and heart rate (as mentioned earlier). These can cause the unit to vibrate so you can feel that you need to pick up the pace etc rather than having to keep an eye on the display.

Another nice touch for use in the water is that you can set a countdown to start the timer and also there is a setting that kind of takes into consideration the GPS signal during the swim. If you stow the watch under your swim hat then you should have a decent signal, however, if worn on the wrist then the signal will be sporadic at best as the unit will be in
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Last edited by pobby69 on October 28, 2011 at 10:29 pm
and out of the water all the time.

The display is very configurable, depending on the sport selected you can choose pretty much what you want to see. So, if you find while running that you want to see current pace, distance and heart rate, you can set it up to show that.

Virtual training partner allows you to set the average pace that you want to train at and the unit displays your progress in comparison. It shows you how many metres and seconds (or minutes) you are ahead or behind of your virtual partner based on the pace you set.

You can sign up to Garmin Connect – a great website that takes all your data and displays it as valuable information along with a Google map of your route which also allows you to “replay” the session or race.

The 310XT makes use of ANT+ technology which allows for seamless transmission of data from the unit to the computer and via the supplied USB dongle. Providing there is an internet connection, the data will be directly upload to Garmin Connect.

Overall – I really like the 310XT, it comes packed with pretty much all you could want. Having owned the Polar RS800CX I think I prefer the Garmin unit for sports use. One difference between the two units is that you could actually wear the Polar as a watch day to day. During the swim, the Garmin will not record the heart rate as the signal does not transfer through the water, this is also the case with the Polar.

Rating: 9/10.

Images are copyright and courtesy of BHIP Ltd.

Open Water Swim Swimming

June 7, 2011 Leave a comment

I completed my first Open Water Swim (OWS) session the year last Wednesday (1st June). Having not really been in the water much at all since August last year I was a bit apprehensive about it knowing how the compression of the wetsuit can make one feel and also the possibility of fatigue part way round the course.

It wasn’t as bad as I had feared thankfully!

I was number 58 at the session and there were still people registering after me so there was a good few people enjoying the water on a lovely sunny afternoon. Having squuezed into the wewtsuit (which I’m sure has shrunk over winter!) I got into the water to get used to the feel of it again. When wetsuit swimming you let a bit of water in through the collar so that your body heat warms it up which in turn keeps you a bit warmer. The shock of the lake water making it’s way down the suit was chilling!!!

Still, didn’t have to wait around too long before we set off. I took my customary position out wide so that the majority of people didn’t swim over me and set off at a tentative pace. I didn’t want to go off too quickly as I wanted to make sure I didn’t get panicky with the feeling from the wetsuit and struggling for breathing pattern. My plan worked as I crawled further into the lake and found my rhythm.

Whitlingham OWS

Whitlingham OWS

With my Garmin Forerunner 310XT on my wrist I knew the capturing of my route would not be 100% accurate due to satellite signal loss when the unit was plunged into the water each stroke but it wasn’t too bad and gives a good idea of how I went.

I have another session tomorrow and will try putting the unit under my swim cap to see if that gives a more accurate route.

In summary I am pleased to have completed the first session with no problems and looking forward to the next one and also the Fritton Lake tri on Sunday!

Follow this link to see my stats and route:
http://connect.garmin.com/activity/89499550